The Genius in Two of Us

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Anyone interested in the source of creativity will want to check out my brother Joshua Wolf Shenk's new series on creative pairs in Slate. He brilliantly and boldly takes on the overpowering myth of solo accomplishment that so much of our culture is built upon.  


For hundreds of years, science and culture have focused on the self. We talk of self-expression, self-realization. Popular culture celebrates the hero. Schools test intelligence and learning through solo exams. Biographies shape our view of history.

And yet:

Collaboration yields so much of what is novel, useful, and beautiful.

The series, and the book that will eventually follow, is going to weave together biology, psychology, history, and popular culture in an effort to ferret out why collaborations happen and how they work. 

Needless to say, he welcomes your input.

Read the full story at Slate.

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David Shenk is a writer on genetics, talent and intelligence. He is the author of Data Smog, The Forgetting, and most recently, The Genius In All of Us. More

David Shenk is the author of six books, including Data Smog ("indispensable"—The New York Times), The Immortal Game ("superb"—The Wall Street Journal), and the bestselling The Forgetting ("a remarkable addition to the literature of the science of the mind."—The Los Angeles Times ). He has contributed to National Geographic, Slate, The New York Times, Gourmet, Harper's, The New Yorker, The American Scholar, and National Public Radio. Shenk's work inspired the Emmy-award winning PBS documentary The Forgetting and was featured in the Oscar-nominated feature Away From Her. His latest book, The Genius In All Of Us, was published in March 2010. Shenk has advised the President's Council on Bioethics and is a popular speaker. Click here to follow him on Twitter.

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