NPR CEO: We Want to Partner With Journalism Startups


NPR CEO Vivian Schiller wants her organization and its local affiliates to partner with the journalism startup companies that have been growing up through the wreckage of the newspaper business

The pitch she made here at the Aspen Ideas Festival is simple. Innovative journalism startups can do great work but they have trouble attracting large audiences, a problem David Carr calls "the tyranny of small numbers." Public radio stations have millions of listeners, but limited budgets. Put the two types of organizations together and you have quality, well-researched journalism reaching large numbers of people. 

In this short, exclusive video, she describes her vision for collaboration -- and how news startups might best get involved with her organization. She specifically called out three organizations that NPR member stations are working with, and that you should keep an eye on: The Texas Tribune in Austin, the St. Louis Beacon, and the Watchdog Institute in San Diego. 
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