Stanley McChrystal and the Racing Pierogi

A minor parallel today between the worlds of politics and sports: Gen. Stanley McChrystal commits the PR blunder of the year and is on his way to the White House to explain criticisms of the administration and the president he made in a Rolling Stone profile, his future as commander of the U.S. war effort in doubt ... only four days after the Pittsburgh Pirates fired a racing pierogi for making disparaging remarks about the team.


Andrew Kurtz, 24, of New Brighton, one of the 18 men who take turns posing as pierogies in a crowd-pleasing race after the fifth inning of every game at PNC Park, was dismissed by the team Thursday because he posted disparaging remarks about the Pirates on his Facebook page...

Thursday, at 4:30 p.m., he posted a message aimed at team president Frank Coonelly, general manager Neal Huntington and manager John Russell. It read: "Coonelly extended the contracts of Russell and Huntington through the 2011 season. That means a 19-straight losing streak. Way to go Pirates."

One of these infractions is more serious than the other. Fox Business reported the pierogi situation this morning, and the presence of McChrystal's and Kurtz's errors in the same cable-news cycle may or may not perfectly encapsulate the literary definition of juxtaposition.
Presented by

Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

What LBJ Really Said About Selma

"It's going to go from bad to worse."

Video

Does This Child Need Marijuana?

Inside a family's fight to use marijuana oils to treat epilepsy

Video

A Miniature 1950s Utopia

A reclusive artist built this idealized suburb to grapple with his painful childhood memories.

Video

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her school. Then the Internet heard her story.

More in Entertainment

Just In