'The Good Wife': Peter's Back at Home

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In this week's episode of The Good Wife, Peter is finally home, though attached to ankle cuffs and threatened with immediate revocation of his jail release if he so much as winks at an email. Alicia is affectionate, at a distance, and is not yet ready, apparently, to resume a connubial relationship. Nor is she inclined to retreat from her responsible, available parent role in the management of her household and children.

In the meantime, as always, Alicia helps her firm, this time engineering the acquittal of a young man accused of shooting to death his deeply crooked employer. The mechanisms for these legal triumphs are becoming increasingly truncated and gimmicky, and in this case Alicia must also cope with Will, the smitten senior partner, who shuffles Alicia from case to case in an obvious effort to nurture her indebtedness to him and an appreciation of his powerful influence in her life. In this, as in other such moments, Alicia remains sweetly non-committal.

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C. Michael Curtis has been an editor at The Atlantic since 1963. Under his direction, the magazine has won numerous fiction prizes, including the National Magazine Award for fiction. More

C. Michael Curtis"Writers crave the intelligence and ardor of this magazine's editors and readership as well as the privilege of inclusion in its pages," says best-selling author Louise Erdrich, who, like so many young fiction writers, was introduced to national readership and subsequent success in The Atlantic Monthly.

Under the direction of senior editor C. Michael Curtis, The Atlantic Monthly's fiction has been nominated for a National Magazine Award virtually every year; in 1988 The Atlantic won this prestigious prize. Year after year short stories from the magazine are chosen for inclusion in the important annual prize collections. Curtis himself was the editor of American Stories: Fiction From The Atlantic Monthly, which was published in 1990. A second volume came out the following year, and 1992 saw the publication of Contemporary New England Stories. A companion volume, Contemporary West Coast Stories, was published in the fall of 1993. A fifth collection, entitled God: Stories, was published in December, 1998, by Houghton Mifflin, and a companion anthology, Faith: Stories, was published in 2003, also by Houghton Mifflin. His own essays, articles, reviews, and poems have been published in The Atlantic, The New Republic, National Review, and Sport, among other periodicals. Curtis is also renowned for his teaching: he has taught creative writing, ethics, grammar, and other subjects for more than thirty years at Harvard, MIT, Cornell, Tufts, Boston University, Bennington, and elsewhere, and now teaches writing at Wofford College, in Spartanburg, SC, where he occupies the John C. Cobb Chair in the Humanities.

Curtis earned a B.A. in English from Cornell in 1956. He came to The Atlantic in 1963 after four years of study toward a Ph.D. in government, also at Cornell. Previously he had worked as a reporter for The Ithaca Journal, and as an editorial assistant at Newsweek. While he was a graduate student, The Atlantic Monthly published three of his poems and employed him briefly as a summer reader.

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