New Sport of the Day: Faux Kidnapping

Bungee jumping and skydiving are just so...not fraught with weird psychological overtones.

For the thrill-seeker who's tired of the lame old adrenaline sports, a French company is offering to stage your fake kidnapping. All you need is $1,200 (900 euros) and bizarre body-snatching fantasies.

According to Reuters, the company is called Ultime Réalité (for those who don't parlent français, that's French for "ultimate reality") and they offer several packages. Clients can:

buy a basic kidnap package where they're bundled away, bound and gagged, and kept incarcerated for four hours. Alternatively, they can opt for a more elaborate tailor-made psychodrama, involving an escape or helicopter chase for example, where costs can quickly escalate.

The company had only been open a few weeks and was already receiving two requests a day when Reuters interviewed them.

While they do offer tailor-made kidnappings and will surprise you (a scheduled kidnapping is no fun!), the longest Ultime Réalité will hold you is 11 hours because any longer and "clients might find the novelty tends to wear off."

Why would someone want to do this? I don't know, but doesn't it all seem like a fittingly post-Guantanamo pastime? (No?) Imagine the stories you'd get to tell! Also, you'd never lose a game of two truths and a lie again.

Anyway, if this all sounds like the plot to a late-nineties movie starring Michael Douglas with Sean Penn, that's because it was. Watch the trailer of The Game:



(h/t to Springwise)
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Niraj Chokshi is a former staff editor at TheAtlantic.com, where he wrote about technology. He is currently freelancing and can be reached through his personal website, NirajC.com. More

Niraj previously reported on the business of the nation's largest law firms for The Recorder, a San Francisco legal newspaper. He has also been published in The Hartford Courant, The Seattle Times and The Age, in Melbourne, Australia. He's also a longtime programmer and sometimes website designer.

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