Music Loses 2 Icons: Jim Marshall, Johnny Maestro

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Varese Sarabande

The music world lost two icons this week: rock photographer Jim Marshall and doo-wop singer Johnny Maestro.

Marshall, who was 74 when he died in his sleep on Tuesday, captured classic moments in the history of rock and roll, including Johnny Cash giving the camera the middle finger at San Quentin Prison in 1969 and Jimi Hendrix burning his guitar at 1967's Monterey Pop Festival.

Photographer Pat Johnson called Marshall "the God of rock photography" in the San Francisco Chronicle's obituary:

Everyone looked up to Jim, and he was just so generous of spirit to me and other photographers. There will never be another Jim Marshall, but his images will live on."

Maestro, who was 70 when he died of cancer Wednesday night—was a member of the Crests, who had a hit in 1958 with "16 Candles"—and The Brooklyn Bridge.

Les Cauchi, a fellow Brooklyn Bridge member, remembered Maestro in the Associated Press' obituary:

He's considered one of the premier vocalists in rock 'n' roll—and one of the nicest, most sincere perfectionists in music.

Here's a recording of "16 Candles":

Presented by

Eleanor Barkhorn is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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