Juan Williams half-apologizes; blames the Atlantic first

So the folks over at NPR caught some heat after Williams claimed that Michelle Obama had "Stokely Carmichael in a dress" thing going and that her tendency was to blame America first. Folks who want a refresher on what I had to say can see here, here and here. Anyway here's Williams serving up a bowl of lame-sauce, and giving a patented, "I'm sorry if the truth I spoke hurt your over-sensitive feelings" sort of apology:

When I asked Williams about his comments, he initially called it a "faux controversy."

But then he reviewed the tape and realized that "the tone and tenor of my comments may have spurred a strong reaction to what I considered to be pure political analysis of the First Lady's use of her White House pulpit," said Williams via email. "I regret that in the fast-paced, argumentative format my tone and tenor seems to have led people to see me as attacking instead of explaining my informed point of view."

That wasn't good enough. Williams went on to say that he was referencing a Politico article and piece in The Atlantic. I can't speak for the Politico, but I've spent some time with that Atlantic profile (That Tanesha Coates girl, she sho can write!) and I'm not sure how anyone would read it and conclude that Michelle Obama is either Stokely Carmichael in a dress, or someone who's likely to blame America first. But that's just me. I've been wrong before.

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Ta-Nehisi Coates is a national correspondent at The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is the author of the memoir The Beautiful Struggle.

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