Edward Tenner

Edward Tenner is a historian of technology and culture, and an affiliate of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School. He was a founding advisor of Smithsonian's Lemelson Center.

  • American Drivers: Knowing and Doing

    With the Memorial Day weekend and the summer holiday season arriving, you might be wondering what's a safer place to drive, the Big Sky roads of…

  • The Test of Time

    Graduates doubting the wisdom of Daniel Akst's thoughts on self-employment should ponder this column by John Kelly in the Washington Post on the…

  • Being Realistic

    An analysis of fuel efficiency and automotive safety in USA Today by Jayne O'Donnell and James R. Healey raises big questions about laws and…

  • A Work in Progress

    Another major US government information technology project is on the rocks, according to the Washington Post. This time the agency is not the FBI but…

  • Driving a Hard Bargain

    The Washington Post's Warren Brown has an intriguing history lesson on the customer-relations problems of the American car industry. Haggling was…

  • Larceny 2.0

    Where have all the bad guys gone? To the electronic frontier, like other ambitious people, of course. Yes, the criminal world has upgraded from 1970s…

  • Take My Model -- Please!

    The Debt theme issue of the New York Times Magazine features a tongue-in-cheek interview with Myron Scholes, winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics…

  • The Un-Banker Look

    One of the rare financial benefits of going freelance: It slashes your dry cleaning bills. That's what first occurred to me on reading "When No One…

  • Tipping Points

    What do flat-screen televisions, soft-drink vending machines, and spectacular bridges have in common? All have hidden design flaws that engineers…

  • If You're Happy and You Know It . . .

    The Boston Globe Ideas section has an essay by the staff writer Drake Bennett on the implications of happiness research for the law. It's not…

  • They Made It Go Up

    When I read about the newspaper crisis, I think of Edwin Diamond, the New York University journalism professor who opened a conference I attended on…

  • Does This Bug Have Legs?

    The H1N1 epidemic began as a prologue to tragedy and is ending like a Gilda Radner - Emily Litella sketch from the old Saturday Night Live: "Never…

  • Immoderation Nation

    The Wall Street Journal reports that Procter & Gamble and Colgate have responded vigorously to consumers' new thrifty avoidance of higher-priced…

  • Threat Share

    Ted Anthony of the Associated Press interviewed me for his provocative analysis of the American spirit in a time of troubles. My take:If people had a…

  • Next Time

    "Don't say 'If only,' say 'next time,'" goes the familiar saying. But there's a problem in learning from mistakes. If we're not extremely careful,…

  • Rook Dreams
    Jason Schneider

    Rook Dreams

    New chess software makes it easier for younger players to reach the top of their game—and harder to stay there

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Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

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Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

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Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

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A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

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Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

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