America's Most Famous Weather Man: Strongly in Favor of Snow Days

Al Roker was not happy about New York City's decision to keep schools open today.
Kathy Willens/AP Images

There are two kinds of people in America right now: People who love snow days, and people who think snow days are for wimps. Which group you ally with depends on several factors. Age: Older people believe they didn't have snow days when they were kids, so why should we have them now? Where you live: Mid-westerners are weather warriors who look down on snow-day-happy Southern states. Whether you're a student (highly pro-snow day) or a parent with school-age kids (extremely anti-snow day).

Another factor that influences your attitude toward snow days: being a very famous weather man. Al Roker—Today show anchor, cookbook author, and star of several viral videos—was not happy when New York City mayor Bill de Blasio kept schools open today:

[Note: He was so angry, he misspelled the mayor's last name.] Roker was particularly upset that the city seemed to ignore the weather reports leading up to today's big snow storm:

He went on to question De Blasio's fitness to lead:

De Blasio is up for re-election in 2017. The vote will serve as a referendum on where the people of New York City stand on snow days.

Presented by

Eleanor Barkhorn is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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