Disruption in the Developing World

For all the progress across the developing world in recent decades, emerging economies still face chronic problems today -- whether from poverty, illness, infrastructural weakness, economic stagnation, or other challenges. At the same time, thanks to increasing globalization, high-impact ideas and technologies can spread more rapidly, and with greater effect, than ever before. What does this mean for global development?

To get at the issue, The Atlantic has teamed with the Skoll World Forum to ask some of the world's leading voices on social entrepreneurship to respond to a single question: Over the next 10 years, what will be the most disruptive force driving social progress in the developing world?



Unleashing the Power of Data and Technology to Rebalance the World Noor Khamis/Reuters

Unleashing the Power of Data and Technology to Rebalance the World

Developing countries have moved from being the site of development initiatives to the transmitter of development innovation.

The Political Key to Lasting Progress in the Developing World Noor Khamis/Reuters

The Political Key to Lasting Progress in the Developing World

The importance of building the capacity of local governments

Young People Have the Power to Change the World Amit Dave/Reuters

Young People Have the Power to Change the World

... despite half of the world's youth living on less than two dollars a day.

Global Volunteerism Is Good For Business

Global Volunteerism Is Good For Business

The benefits of sending your employees to Kenya for a month.

How Social Media Could Revolutionize Third-World Cities Reuters

How Social Media Could Revolutionize Third-World Cities

Networking technologies are about to make governments more accountable and transparent.

Ambition: The Great Disruptor Mohammed Ameen/Reuters

Ambition: The Great Disruptor

Technologies that can deliver self-improvement are becoming ever more accessible to those who seek it.

Panelists