David Dobbs

David Dobbs writes regularly for The Atlantic, The New York Times Magazine, National Geographic, and Wired. His most recent book, Reef Madness, looks at a long argument that Charles Darwin had about how coral reefs form.

  • The Science of Success
    Vault49

    The Science of Success

    Most of us have genes that make us as hardy as dandelions: able to take root and survive almost anywhere. A few of us, however, are more like the orchid: fragile and fickle, but capable of blooming spectacularly if given greenhouse care. So holds a provocative new theory of genetics, which asserts that the very genes that give us the most trouble as a species, causing behaviors that are self-destructive and antisocial, also underlie humankind’s phenomenal adaptability and evolutionary success. With a bad environment and poor parenting, orchid children can end up depressed, drug-addicted, or in jail—but with the right environment and good parenting, they can grow up to be society’s most creative, successful, and happy people.

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A doctor tries the ever-popular Master Cleanse. Sort of.

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Using hand-drawn cartoons to explain an academic passion

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What If Emoji Lived Among Us?

A whimsical ad imagines what life would be like if emoji were real.

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Living Alone on a Sailboat

"If you think I'm a dirtbag, then you don't understand the lifestyle."

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The Future of Iced Coffee

Are artisan businesses like Blue Bottle doomed to fail when they go mainstream?

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