David Dobbs

David Dobbs writes regularly for The Atlantic, The New York Times Magazine, National Geographic, and Wired. His most recent book, Reef Madness, looks at a long argument that Charles Darwin had about how coral reefs form.

  • The Science of Success
    Vault49

    The Science of Success

    Most of us have genes that make us as hardy as dandelions: able to take root and survive almost anywhere. A few of us, however, are more like the orchid: fragile and fickle, but capable of blooming spectacularly if given greenhouse care. So holds a provocative new theory of genetics, which asserts that the very genes that give us the most trouble as a species, causing behaviors that are self-destructive and antisocial, also underlie humankind’s phenomenal adaptability and evolutionary success. With a bad environment and poor parenting, orchid children can end up depressed, drug-addicted, or in jail—but with the right environment and good parenting, they can grow up to be society’s most creative, successful, and happy people.

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