Daniel Akst

Dan Akst is a journalist, essayist and novelist who wrote three books. His novel, The Webster Chronicle, is based on the lives of Cotton and Increase Mather. More

Dan Akst is a journalist, novelist and essayist whose work has appeared frequently in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, Wilson Quarterly, and many other publications.
  • Clean Living, My Foot!

    Once upon a time the characteristic foot disorder of the well-to-do was gout, induced by an excess of rich foods. Lots of famous people have had it,…

  • No More Jive Turkey

    Last year at Thanksgiving we bought a turkey from a local farm and it cost $58. I couldn't help noticing, around the same time, that our local…

  • An Arresting Development

    From today's Wall Street Journal:In 1967, 50% of American men had been arrested. Since then, arrests made in connection with domestic violence and…

  • Toying with Bigness

    I've blogged in this space before about the many ways in which modern life promotes bigness--in business, government, finance, health care and so…

  • The Future of the Book

    Recently my wife and I got iPhones. There's a lot to say about them, but most of it has been said, so I'll spare you. What I find most interesting…

  • Help the Poor. Go Buy Something From Them.

    From John Cassidy's forthcoming book, How Markets Fail: "In China between 1981 and 2005, according to a recent study by researchers at the World Bank…

  • Mondo Condo

    This striking paragraph is from the excellent Calculatedrisk blog, which is filled with useful data and insight:. . .this is a reminder that new high…

  • Technology, My Foot

    Today I went to see a very capable podiatrist who really had no idea that he had ever seen me before. His office has only paper records, ships them…

  • Death by Uninsurance

    A new Harvard study estimates that lack of health insurance kills about 45,000 Americans annually, which is 2.5 times as many as the previous best…

  • The End of Civilization

    Ok, I exaggerate. It's a headline! Still, it's stunning to read that the headmaster of a fancy Massachusetts prep school is giving away the 20,000…

  • Off Base Betting

    Here is one of those stories guaranteed to convert a few more readers to libertarianism. New York's seedy Off Track Betting parlors, part of a…

  • Handy Heuristic

    The Boston Globe reports on financial troubles at WGBH, the nationally important public broadcaster up there, which just two years ago celebrated the…

  • In a Nutshell

    Mike Winerip has a fine, sad story in the New York Times about a 58-year-old man who went from a highly paid executive position to 18 months of…

  • Quick, Option the Rights!

    For years Hollywood has peddled crappy, simplistic movies about a heroic little person standing up to greedy corporations, unfeeling bureaucrats and…

  • The Shock of the Old

    Bedbugs are getting more and more attention lately, which makes me wonder if anyone is ever going to test my pet theory about this -- that the growth…

  • Where Are The Headline-Seeking Pols When We Need Them?

    For awhile now I've been dragging my feet on the task of upgrading our family's cell-phone service. It's the usual story: we want iPhones but we also…

  • Kidneys Again

    The Associated Press has a fascinating story about an unrepentant man who says he sold a kidney for $20,000, saving the life of a guy on Long Island…

  • Transatlantic Mysteries

    Yesterday my friend Chris and I drove into the Alps from Vienna, and during the trip I asked him a question that's been puzzling me. Why, given their…

  • London Calling

    I've been in London for about a week, assuaging my time-zone difficulties, late at night, with the Yanks and Red Sox on ESPN America. Given the…

  • Are we repressing?

    Journalists love anniversaries, but I'm surprised that hardly anyone has noticed a significant one: this month is the centennial of Freud's first and…

Video

The Best 71-Second Animation You'll Watch Today

A rock monster tries to save a village from destruction.

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The Case for Napping at Work

Most Americans don't get enough sleep. More and more employers are trying to help address that.

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A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

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Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

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Stunning GoPro Footage of a Wildfire

In the field with America’s elite Native American firefighting crew

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