Could An Obese Goalie Change Hockey? Ctd

A reader writes:

Speaking of obese goalies, this Amstel Light spot, from about six years ago, ponders the same thing.

Another writes:

I'm sure I'm not the only one to send a link to the children's book "Porko von Popbutton", but I remember it vividly from childhood (it was actually published in Sports Illustrated back in the '60s, which I did not know). The hero is a bullied fat boy who gets sent to a hockey-mad boarding school.

Another:

I don't know about hockey, but obese athletes already changed Olympic bobsled. 

In the 1952 Olympics, "[t]here were no weight restrictions on the bobsleigh athletes, consequently the average weight for each member of the winning German four-man team was 117 kg (260 lb)". Here's a photo of the German two-man team.

Another:

In response to the fat goalie article: It's been covered!  In song no less!

Another:

The West Wing got there first - Sam Seaborn, "Stirred," Season Three:

Sam: "You know what I'd do if I owned a hockey team? I'd hire a sumo wrestler. I'd give him a uniform, transportation, 500 bucks a week to sit in the goal, eat a ham sandwich, and enjoy the game. My team would never get scored on."

2006-2011 archives for The Daily Dish, featuring Andrew Sullivan

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

The Horrors of Rat Hole Mining

"The river was our source of water. Now, the people won't touch it."

Video

What's Your Favorite Slang Word?

From "swag" to "on fleek," tweens choose.

Video

Cryotherapy's Dubious Appeal

James Hamblin tries a questionable medical treatment.

Video

Confessions of Moms Around the World

In Europe, mothers get maternity leave, discounted daycare, and flexible working hours.

Video

How Do Trees Know When It's Spring?

The science behind beautiful seasonal blooming

Just In