Preferring New Capitalism To Old

Reihan isn't nostalgic for the past:

[Rob] Horning contrasts the “security that once came from long-term employment with large firms and the safety net supplied jointly by employers and the state” with the post-Fordist, neoliberal order created by “deregulation, outsourcing, globalization and total worker flexibility,” and I think it’s safe to say he believes that much has been lost. I don’t want to caricature Horning’s view, as I’m sure he understands that Fordist solidarity was built on exclusion, that entrenched gender inequality was a foundation of “family wage” social democracy, etc. And I recognize that my highly idiosyncratic subjective experience has inclined me towards preferring the new capitalism to the old.

Horning responds that he doesn't "think we can or should try to turn back the clock":

[T]he new forms of social relations offer certain freedoms at the cost of having to commodify oneself at a deeper level than wage slavery required, with more of everyday life subsumed into capitalism, made business like, subject to its procedures of rational calculation. Some of what stems from that is good: At times work is more harmonious with one’s overall life, at times it feels good to have the market assess the quality and extent of one’s sociality, at times the flexibility increasingly expected of us prompts us to be and feel more creative, at times our self-consciousness leads to a rewarding consideration of what other people are thinking, and not just what they are thinking of us.

But the negative aspects are inseparable from those positive aspects. 

2006-2011 archives for The Daily Dish, featuring Andrew Sullivan

How to Build a Tornado

A Canadian inventor believes his tornado machine could solve the world's energy crisis. The only problem? He has to prove it works.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

How to Build a Tornado

A Canadian inventor believes his tornado machine could solve the world's energy crisis.

Video

A New York City Minute, Frozen in Time

This short film takes you on a whirling tour of the Big Apple

Video

What Happened to the Milky Way?

Light pollution has taken away our ability to see the stars. Can we save the night sky?

Video

The Pentagon's $1.5 Trillion Mistake

The F-35 fighter jet was supposed to do everything. Instead, it can barely do anything.

Just In