Cereal Killers

The-last-breakfast

Peter Smith summarizes a new study on children's reactions to sugary cereals with and without cartoon characters:

Healthy Bits beat out a similar cereal labeled Sugar Bitswith or without the happy little penguins. So it looks like messages about healthy eating habits are reaching these kids, who, at least in a clinical setting, want something labeled "healthy" over something labeled "sugar."

But here's where the penguins come in. When the researchers added penguins to the packaging, Sugar Bits rated as high as Healthy Bits.

James Joyner reminisces:

I ate various sugary cereals growing up, including all manner of Cap’n Crunch products that came and went (I seem to recall cinnamon and vanilla varieties; the peanut butter variety remains a very occasional indulgence), various chocolate flavored cereals that turned the milk brown, and cereals with cartoon characters like the Flintstones, Count Chocula, Frankenberry, Booberry, and others.

Somehow, I survived the experience thin and healthy. Perhaps it has something to do with another bygone tradition of youth: going outside to play.

(Image: The Last Breakfast by Brian Stuckey)

2006-2011 archives for The Daily Dish, featuring Andrew Sullivan

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