"Sooner Or Later Nearly Everyone On Haaretz Gets Called A Nazi"

David Remnick's must-read on Israel's leftist newspaper reveals, among many other things, the heavy cross that it bears:

[Columnist Gideon] Levy makes reporting trips to the West Bank every week. He thinks of himself as forcing Israeli society to see. “The dehumanization of the Palestinians in the Israeli media allows the public to feel fine about it all,” he told me one evening in the newsroom. “With the assistance of the Israeli media, we’ve built a world of our own, in which all criticism of the Israeli government is anti-Semitism, in which ‘they are all against us, anyway’which is not true. We are more spoiled than any state in the world. ...

Since the talks between Arafat and Barak collapsed, a decade ago, mainstream public opinion in Israel has become a paradox: majority support for the idea of a two-state solution, but a generalized distrust of Palestinian intentions. Middle Israel feels that it left Lebanon, in 2000, and got rockets from Hezbollah; left Gaza, in 2005, and got rockets from Hamas. The peace camp, despite occasional demonstrations and displays of vitality, is depleted. And so where Haaretz fits into the Israeli future is a serious question.

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