When Mubarak Left: The Twitter Cloud

Amy Davidson captions:

Here is an animated visualization of tweets with the hashtag #Jan25, just before and just after Mubarak’s resignation, with retweets and their connections, by André Panisson of Gephi. ... It’s beautiful. It starts like a spider spinning a web, then a many-pointed structure forms around the center, like a crystal or a new star. But the symmetry is not exact: it is more fearful than mathematical. There are areas that resemble the red spot on Jupiter, and perhaps were similarly stormy. There are pushes and pulls, and maybe shoving. It is more like the the Spirograph drawings I made when I was six, with sudden lurches where my pencil slipped (as it always did), than like the perfectly looping ones in the toy commercials. It is very human.

2006-2011 archives for The Daily Dish, featuring Andrew Sullivan

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