Libya's Future

Room For Debate considers it. Lisa Goldman is the most optimistic:

[T]he people of eastern Libya, largely liberated from Qaddafi’s forces, have already formed a provisionary government led by tribal leaders, who willingly share power with the youth who led the revolution. They have also established a radio station, Voice of Free Libya.

For the 42 years he ruled Libya, Qaddafi ruthlessly suppressed political opposition and reduced the vast majority of people to an existence that was spiritually and materially impoverished. Certainly, there was no education in democratic principles. And yet, their first action, post-Qaddafi, has been to establish democratic institutions and express loyalty for a united Libya, rather than to their tribes.

2006-2011 archives for The Daily Dish, featuring Andrew Sullivan

Does This Child Need Marijuana?

Dravet Syndrome is a severe form of epilepsy that affects children. Could marijuana oils alleviate their seizures?

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Does This Child Need Marijuana?

Inside a family's fight to use marijuana oils to treat epilepsy

Video

A Miniature 1950s Utopia

A reclusive artist built this idealized suburb to grapple with his painful childhood memories.

Video

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her school. Then the Internet heard her story.

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

Just In