Coopting The Opposition

Scott Lucas chronicles the concessions being made by the new government in Tunisia:

The inclusion of the former opposition leaders --- Ahmed Najib Chebbi (PDP), Ahmed Ibrahim (Ettajdid), and Mostafa Mohammad Najar (Union of Freedom and Labour) --- may also deal with the second demand of protesters: representation of all parties in Tunisian politics. The Government also lifted the ban on political parties on Monday, so on paper at least, Tunisia has moved with days from an autocratic, one-party regime to an open, multi-party system.

Lucas lists more:

Ghannouchi also announced ... the release of all political detainees, and the free functioning of unions and syndicates. The Ministry of Communication has been abolished, while new committees will be established for political reform, accountability for recent incidents, and fact-finding into corruption and bribery. ... Prominent blogger Slim Amamou, who was detained a week before the fall of President Ben Ali and released after the collapse of the regime, will be Minister of Youth.

Global Voices rounds up reaction to the blogger appointment.

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