Party Of War

Paul Gottfried looks at the GOP contenders in 2012, and the movement infrastructure that supports them:

Unlike the Tea Party idealists, who were screaming “a plague on both their houses,” Republican foundations, journalists, and fundraisers immensely like what they already have. What they have is a party that manages big government, cuts deals for friendly corporate interests, and waves a big stick militarily... It is the party of the military and like the neoconservatives, Republicans in power talk incessantly about spreading human rights and universalizing the American model of government...

The problem with such running at the mouth is that it keeps our elected officials from doing more sensible things, such as minding the Constitution and limiting administrative overreach. There is in fact a contradiction between the Bushite priorities of Pawlenty, Rove, Romney, and other Republicans and their publicized promise to address the size and reach of government. I doubt they can do both.

2006-2011 archives for The Daily Dish, featuring Andrew Sullivan

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A New York City Minute, Frozen in Time

This short film takes you on a whirling tour of the Big Apple

Video

What Happened to the Milky Way?

Light pollution has taken away our ability to see the stars. Can we save the night sky?

Video

The Faces of #BlackLivesMatter

Scenes from a recent protest in New York City

Video

Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life

The Supreme Court justice talks gender equality and marriage.

Video

The Pentagon's $1.5 Trillion Mistake

The F-35 fighter jet was supposed to do everything. Instead, it can barely do anything.

Just In