The Republican Spider And The Tea Party Starfish

Rauch looks at the structure of the tea parties:

In American politics, radical decentralization has never been tried on so large a scale. Tea party activists believe that their hivelike, “organized but not organized” (as one calls it) structure is their signal innovation and secret weapon, the key to outlasting and outmaneuvering traditional political organizations and interest groups. They intend to rewrite the rule book for political organizing, turning decades of established practice upside down. If they succeed, or even half succeed, the tea party’s most important legacy may be organizational, not political.

(Hat tip: Reihan)

2006-2011 archives for The Daily Dish, featuring Andrew Sullivan

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