How Immigration Patterns Have Changed

Derek Thompson provides a visual. Meanwhile, Eric Barker highlights a study on who is negatively impacted by immigration:

Using data from the 1960–2000 US censuses, we find that a 10% immigration-induced increase in the supply of workers in a particular skill group reduced the black wage of that group by 2.5%, lowered the employment rate by 5.9 percentage points, and increased the incarceration rate by 1.3 percentage points.

2006-2011 archives for The Daily Dish, featuring Andrew Sullivan

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