Will The Republic Hold?

Kurt Anderson fears for American democracy:

Maybe our republic’s constitutional operating system simply can’t scale up to deal satisfactorily with a heterogeneous population of 310 million. When the Constitution was written and the Senate created, there were around 4 million people in America, or about one senator for every 150,000 people. For Congress to be as representative as it was in 1789, we’d need to elect 2,000 senators and 5,000 House members. And so I wonder, as I watch Senate leaders irresponsibly playing to the noisiest, angriest parts of the peanut gallery, if the current, possibly suicidal spectacle of anti-government “populism” in Washington isn’t connected to our bloated people-to-Congresspeople ratios.

Ezra Klein disagrees. Jonathan Bernstein uses Anderson's piece to talk about Madison.

2006-2011 archives for The Daily Dish, featuring Andrew Sullivan

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