“Well, I Don’t Really Want To Shake Your Hand, You’re Intrinsically Evil” Ctd

A reader writes:

Years ago, I had a dust-up with Ryan Sorba in my school's newspaper.  Ryan made all kinds of nasty statements regarding gays by using Paul Cameron's research.  The article should not have been published, and the newspaper editor apologized later about it, but I wrote a response that really angered Ryan Sorba.  He started a series of emails, but he was completely ignorant and chose to use any "fact" that he felt supported his position.  It did not matter who the fact came from or if it was false.  I had to eventually shut off communication with Ryan.

He put up a series of posters around the school that were incorrect and cruel (like how gay men ate feces).  He tried to take over the College Republicans and refuse gay people (and his attempts were very public).  He also tried to create a list of "liberal" professors to avoid. 

He was a nuisance and everyone was happy when he left because he was very homophobic and nasty.  Every few years I hear about Ryan and his antics, which always seem to be about self-promotion (his speech at CPAC had him saying how much he loved people opposing him).

About a year ago, out of the blue he calls a fellow employee (at a different school) and leaves a voice mail message.  I had not seen or talked to Ryan for years.  He says that I need to quit attacking him and that I cannot talk about him, even though I had not talked about him at all to anyone.  He then says I need to be fired and that he is going to get me.  This peer is completely shocked about this because the peer has nothing to do with me and did not understand why Ryan Sorba called him.

There is something wrong with Ryan Sorba.  His anger and irrational behavior is over the top, and I can't understand why CPAC would allow him to even speak in the first place. 

Another writes:

Sorba's book is online. You are described in it as "pro-sodomy journalist Andrew Sullivan." Stonewall was an act of "terrorism as a means to achieve power."

2006-2011 archives for The Daily Dish, featuring Andrew Sullivan

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