Learning From Massachusetts

Suderman worries:

The short-term incentives in politics often run towards passage of large-scale legislation without regard to its efficacy, and so, with an any-bill-is-better-than-no-bill ethos in place, we end up with the legislative equivalent of paying shipbuilders to launch the biggest boat they can, all the while accepting their assurances that, even if it’s leaking now, we can always figure out how to float long-term once we’re at sea.

A commenter bats the ball back over the line:

...the boat we are on has large gaping holes in it and is in the process of sinking. I’d prefer a new boat, even one with some holes.

2006-2011 archives for The Daily Dish, featuring Andrew Sullivan

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her middle school. Then Humans of New York told her story to the Internet—and everything changed.

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