Orwell In Burma

His novel, Burmese Days, remains a brilliant excoriation of colonialism. But Nineteen-Eighty-Four is perhaps the better book for understanding what is happening in Burma today. From the Burmese government press:

The government has been striving day and night together with the people for the emergence of a peaceful, modern and developed discipline-flourishing democratic nation.

As the government has been endeavouring to ensure stability of State, community peace, the rule of law and national development that are the main requirements, the national races in all regions are practically enjoying the fruits of national peace and development.

However, saboteurs from inside and outside the nation and some foreign radio stations, who are jealous of national peace and development, have been making instigative acts through lies to cause internal instability and civil commotion.

2006-2011 archives for The Daily Dish, featuring Andrew Sullivan

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