This Is Not Necessarily What You Want to See in Your Inbox

By James Fallows
[Tech update: If you cannot see the image in this item, please click here. Yesterday we changed the way we handle images, and there are some transition details still to be worked out.] 

Yes, I can read this -- written characters are my friend, spoken Chinese with its tones and its indistinguishable q/x/sh fricatives is my foe -- and I know that it is a security warning about someone trying to log into an Apple account with my email ID. I think I received it (and not the English counterpart) because I bought the equipment in question earlier this year at an Apple store in the Wangfujing district of Beijing.

Still, I couldn't help doing a double-take on getting a security warning in this form. And, perhaps irrationally, wondering if it was phishing. To be safe, I went to the English-language Apple site (and not the linked Chinese site) and changed the relevant passwords. No larger point, but to me an interesting little document about our connected-for-better-and-worse world. 

This article available online at:

http://www.theatlantic.com/china/archive/2013/10/this-is-not-necessarily-what-you-want-to-see-in-your-inbox/280860/