China's Leadership Is Really, Really Rich

One need not wonder why official corruption is such a concern there.
More
businessinsider.jpgDeutsche Bank

35 or so years ago, China's leaders weren't that much better off than the people they served. That has, according to this chart (via Business Insider), has changed. A lot.

The cozy relationship between politics and money exists in every society, but it's striking to see the extent to which wealth buys influence in China. The government has attempted to crack down on corruption by banning ostentatious displays of wealth among government leaders, hoping that fewer boozy lunches and expensive watches will improve the Party's image among common people. But unless the fundamental link between political and financial advancement is severed, it's hard to imagine anything changing.
Jump to comments

Matt Schiavenza is a former associate editor at The Atlantic

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

CrossFit Versus Yoga: Choose a Side

How a workout becomes a social identity


Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

CrossFit Versus Yoga: Choose a Side

How a workout becomes a social identity

Video

Is Technology Making Us Better Storytellers?

The minds behind House of Cards and The Moth weigh in.

Video

A Short Film That Skewers Hollywood

A studio executive concocts an animated blockbuster. Who cares about the story?

Video

In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

Video

What Is a Sandwich?

We're overthinking sandwiches, so you don't have to.

Video

Let's Talk About Not Smoking

Why does smoking maintain its allure? James Hamblin seeks the wisdom of a cool person.

Writers

Up
Down

More in China

Just In