Caroline Anstey

Caroline Anstey is the managing director of the World Bank Group More

 

A UK national, Caroline Anstey, joined the World Bank in 1995 after an earlier career in politics and journalism. She worked as Political Assistant to the Rt. Hon. James Callaghan MP, and as Editor of the BBC weekly current affairs program "Analysis". Caroline also served as Secretariat member of the InterAction Council, a group of former Heads of Government that develops recommendations on political, economic, and social issues. Caroline holds a PhD from the London School of Economics and a Post-Doctoral Fellowship from Nuffield College, Oxford. 

Since 1995, Caroline has worked in various positions in the World Bank including: Country Director for the Caribbean; Director of Media Relations and Chief Spokesperson; and Assistant and Speechwriter to World Bank President, James D. Wolfensohn. In November 2007, she was appointed by President Robert B. Zoellick to the position of World Bank Chief of Staff. Then on July 1, 2010, Caroline was appointed as Vice President, External Affairs. She held that position until her appointment as Managing Director on September 19, 2011. As Managing Director, Caroline has special responsibility for the Bank’s operational services, policy and systems and its modernization drive, continuing her commitment to make the Bank an open, results-based and effective organization. She also has special oversight on gender issues.

Caroline Anstey: Blog articles

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