Campaign woes

By Megan McArdle

For journalists, anyway. By travel troubles last week prompted me to remark that I haven't been on an on-time flight in at least a year (though to be sure, I don't fly very often.) My colleague Marc Ambinder responded that this is making it much harder to be a campaign journalist than it used to be. Journalists covering the presidential campaign can basically expect to spend most of the next 52 weeks on the road; the worse flying gets, the worse their lives become. If presidential candidates want to cast themselves in a sympathetic light, they should come up with a plan to reduce the congestion at a few key hubs, particularly JFK, that make listed departure times such a cruel joke.

You know, I never really understood why making the trains run on time was so important for Mussolini, but after last week, I can understand how that became one of fascism's main selling points*.

* The first person who suggests that this is an endorsement of fascism gets sent back to fourth grade for remedial reading class.

This article available online at:

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2007/10/campaign-woes/2169/