Macy's Has a Secret Black Santa

Otherwise known as "special Santa." 

Fresh off the great national kerfuffle over Megyn Kelly's thoughts on Santa's race, Animal New York reporter Amy Nelson checked out a tip that a black St. Nick was on hand at the Macy's flagship store in Manhattan. Turns out he's there! But also kinda of difficult to track down. After meeting a Caucasian Claus at the end of the main Santaland line, Nelson asks one of the store's elves if there's a "special santa." At which point:

About five minutes later, an official-looking woman not dressed as an elf brought me to another lodge (there looked as if there could be as many as three or four different lodges), where a toddler-aged black girl and her black mother were wrapping up their time with a black Santa Claus.

There never was anyone in line behind me to see the special Santa and it was unclear how this woman in front of me knew how to request the black Santa (other black and Latino people were seen visiting his white counterpart).

Which is...odd. I reached out to the store's PR people to get a comment on the video, and haven't gotten a response yet. But anyway, given Macy's role as the semi-official arbiter of all Santa-related disputes, I think we can safely say Black Santa is a verifiable fact.

(h/t Dan Amira)

Presented by

Jordan Weissmann is a senior associate editor at The Atlantic.

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