How We Get the News: Europe vs. Japan vs. the U.S.

Print is dead—in France.
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TV, Internet, print, and radio: How do you get your news? 

Benedict Evans passes along a fun report from the Reuters Institute on the most popular news platforms by country.

I combined radio and print into one category and graphed the seven countries' preferences. What you see, in this breakdown, is that the U.S., UK, Italy, Spain, and Japan aren't so different. In each of these countries, online news and TV news both lead the pack by far, commanding between mid-30 percent and low-40 percent of our preference. The outliers, however, are France, where TV reigns supreme, and Germany, whose affection for print and radio is more than double the U.S.

Another cut of the data: I compared the U.S., France (biggest TV fans, worst print readers), and Japan, which reported the biggest appetite for print and the smallest appetite for radio. Here's the at-a-glance breakdown. 

 

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Derek Thompson is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about economics, labor markets, and the entertainment business.

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