How Technology Makes TV Awesome

Because viewers can catch up on episodes they miss, TV teams are hitting new highs.
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More and more television has started looking like 13- to 20-hour movie dramas, and DVR has made it possible. As Michael Lynton, CEO of Sony USA, explained during a panel discussion at the Aspen Ideas Festival, web TV and recording devices like DVR now allow viewers to catch up on shows they miss, which has opened up new artistic outlets for the industry. Writers can leave plots open-ended and extend character story arcs over many episodes, heightening the quality of drama and attracting a cycle of talent to Hollywood.

"Good writing, by the way, begets good directing, so great directors are now coming into television. In the pilot season this year, there were a bunch of directors who you would have never seen in television before, including Ang Lee, who just won the Oscar, and that gets you great actors," he said.

In the clip below, hear other insights on how technology drives the art of television from Lynton and Twitter CEO Dick Costolo, who spoke with investor Jerry Murdock and former FCC chair Julius Genachowski on the panel.

Via the Aspen Institute

For full coverage of the Aspen Ideas Festival, see here.

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Emma Green is an associate editor at The Atlantic, where she oversees the National Channel, manages TheAtlantic.com’s homepage, and writes about religion and culture.

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