Introducing: The Atlantic Weekly

Our new app is a lean-back weekend guide to how the world is changing.
More
homepage_atlweekly-570.jpg

During its first 90 years, The Atlantic featured its table of contents, rather than a photograph or illustration, on its cover. For this, our first weekly magazine, we've revived that tradition of simplicity--not for sentimental reasons, but because our founders' straightforward approach suits this new publication's mission and its medium. We're aiming to provide readers with a selection of stories and ideas on screens scrubbed of all distractions, for those moments over the weekend when you can pause to sit back, with an iPhone or iPad, and let your mind roam.

On any given day, we now publish dozens of stories across our three Web sites, TheAtlantic.com, The Atlantic Wire, and The Atlantic Cities. No one who doesn't work for The Atlantic can keep up with it all (many of us can't, either), and we suspect that even our most constant readers miss some of our best pieces. The purpose of The Atlantic Weekly is to collect that work into a weekend guide to how the world is changing, and to where that change might take us. In each issue on the iPad, we'll also include a story drawn from our 155-year-deep magazine archive, a piece of great writing that we believe can advance readers' thinking today, as it did when we first published it. (For this inaugural issue, we present Henry Thoreau's "Walking," which ran in The Atlantic in 1862.) We will publish each Friday afternoon so that you can download a new issue before signing off, as we hope you at least sometimes can, for the weekend.

We are asking readers to pay for this magazine. The reason is that we are putting work into it--by editors, designers, and developers--and at least for now we're not including any advertising. This is, for us, another experiment in putting to use any new means available to create and support the journalism of ideas that distinguishes The Atlantic. We hope you will value it.


The Atlantic Weekly is available in the iTunes store now.

Jump to comments
Presented by

James Bennet has been the editor in chief of The Atlantic since 2006. Prior to joining The Atlantic, he was the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times. More

"I wanted a profound and extreme talent who led quietly, was generous to others, and comported himself with collegial respect," remarked Atlantic Media chairman David Bradley when announcing his selection of James Bennet as the magazine's fourteenth editor in chief in early 2006. "On all scores, but surely these, I have conviction on James' appointment." Before joining the Atlantic staff, Bennet was the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times. During his three years in Israel, his coverage of the Middle East conflict was widely acclaimed for its balance and sensitivity. His much-lauded long-form writing for The New York Times Magazine was responsible for catching the eye of David Bradley during his year-long search for a new editor. Upon accepting the position, Bennet told a Times reporter that he saw the Atlantic job as "a chance to help, encourage and preserve the practice of serious, long-form journalism." Bennet is a graduate of Yale University who began his journalism career at The Washington Monthly. Prior to his work in Jerusalem, he served as the Times' White House correspondent and was preparing to join its Beijing bureau when he was offered the Atlantic editorship.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

A Fascinating Short Film About the Multiverse

If life is a series of infinite possibilities, what does it mean to be alive?


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

The Death of Film

You'll never hear the whirring sound of a projector again.

Video

How to Hunt With Poison Darts

A Borneo hunter explains one of his tribe's oldest customs: the art of the blowpipe

Video

A Delightful, Pixar-Inspired Cartoon

An action figure and his reluctant sidekick trek across a kitchen in search of treasure.

Video

I Am an Undocumented Immigrant

"I look like a typical young American."

Video

Why Did I Study Physics?

Using hand-drawn cartoons to explain an academic passion

Writers

Up
Down

More in Business

Just In