Booz Allen Fires Edward Snowden

It's safe to say this will be the least surprising development in the story.

Booz Allen announced this morning that the company has officially fired Edward Snowden, the man behind the NSA leaks, for "violations of the firm's code of ethics."

Here is the complete statement (with new updates underlined):

Booz Allen can confirm that Edward Snowden, 29, was an employee of our firm for less than 3 months, assigned to a team in Hawaii. Snowden, who had a salary at the rate of $122,000, was terminated June 10, 2013 for violations of the firm's code of ethics and firm policy. News reports that this individual has claimed to have leaked classified information are shocking, and if accurate, this action represents a grave violation of the code of conduct and core values of our firm. We will work closely with our clients and authorities in their investigation of this matter.

Strangely, but probably not significantly, the company claims that Snowden's salary was $122,000, even though Snowden told reporters that he was making about $200,000

Also of potential interest: Glenn Greenwald, the Guardian journalist who broke the surveillance story, says he has been working with Snowden since February. If Booz only employed Snowden for "less than three months" before his termination, as they claim, that puts Snowden's first day at Booz some time in March.

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Derek Thompson is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about economics, labor markets, and the entertainment business.

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