Here Come the Raises

In the small, cramped space between what economic bloggers like to think about every day and what your typical family needs to think about every day is this big three-part question: Where are the jobs going, what are they paying, and where are employers looking to make them?

One of my favorite sources for this sort of data is PayScale, whose index is a good way to visualize where wages are going up -- by city, by industry, and by occupation. In the last few months, they helped me show that Houston and mining were winning the recovery and Riverside, Ca., is losing.

This week, PayScale produced its annual compensation report, and the big fat graphic is just below. Here are three of the most important conclusions: (1) Wages are really starting to move, as raises are making a comeback across the economy; (2) Three in five employers encourage social media, while two in five ban it; (3) Nearly 90 percent of employers who use social media rely on LinkedIn for recruiting. Half use Facebook. Twenty percent use Twitter.

PayScale's 2012 Compensation Best Practices Infographic

Source: Payscale

Presented by

Derek Thompson is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about economics, labor markets, and the entertainment business.

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