Report: Washington, D.C., Is Now the Richest U.S. City

More

The nation's capital swapped places with San Jose to become the wealthiest metropolitan area in the country by median income last year, according to Bloomberg analysis of Census data. The typical D.C. household made $84,000 last year, 60% higher than the national median.

Why D.C.? Here are five reasons. First, D.C. has always been pretty well-off, thanks to the nation's highest concentration of college degrees and lawyers. Second, federal employees (who account for about one-sixth of the city) make a cool $126,000 in typical compensation, which seems appropriate since many of them are skimmed from the top of numerous high-paying industries, like finance, regulation, law, and strategic communications. Third, the federal government was the only major part of the economy that grew during the recession, and the region's contractors and employees benefited. (State capitals around the country tended to experience shallower recession for a similar reason: stimulus money flowed from the federal capital through state capitals.) Fourth, despite the president's goals, D.C. is still a hotbed of rich finance and health care lobbyists jockeying for favor in the president's agenda, and they push up the typical salary. Fifth, D.C. is a small city bracketed by two very rich, very well-educated suburban regions that have grown, with the help of government spending (NIH in Maryland; IT in northern Virginia) into economic powerhouses.

I'd be willing to bet that D.C. and San Jose will switch places again next year. The Bloomberg survey looks at 2010 data. In 2011, Republicans have pressed Congress to control spending, and the region has suffered. Since April, the number of employed people in the District has dropped by 9,000, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. "The deterioration in the labor market since April is greater than the deterioration over any five-month period during the recent recession," the report found. Even so, Washington, D.C., is much healthier than almost any other metro area in the country precisely because so much business revolves around the nearly recession-immune federal government, as opposed to the real estate and manufacturing industries, which expand and contract based on uncertain demand rather than guaranteed services.


Jump to comments
Presented by

Derek Thompson is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about economics, labor markets, and the entertainment business.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

What Do You See When You Look in the Mirror?

In a series of candid video interviews, women talk about self-image, self-judgment, and what it means to love their bodies


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.

Video

What Makes a Story Great?

The storytellers behind House of CardsandThis American Life reflect on the creative process.

Video

Tracing Sriracha's Origin to Thailand

Ever wonder how the wildly popular hot sauce got its name? It all started in Si Racha.

Video

Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in Business

Just In