Flowchart: Where the Greek Debt Crisis Goes From Here

Confused about the Greek debt crisis? You're not alone. The latest news is that the European Central Bank is trying out its own version of TARP by creating a so-called "bad bank" to buy up Greece's risky bonds in the hopes of reassuring investors. In return, Athens must agree to a new austerity measures to save enough money to pay back investors who buy their expensive debt. The blog Zero Hedge has passed along a super useful flowchart of what happens if Greece doesn't meet the demands of the Euro zone, the ECB, and the IMF -- i.e. the Troika. Click through. It does a really nice job of explaining why this saga could still produce just about any ending, from a slow, boring victory for the European Union to the dissolution of the euro and a second global recession.

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Derek Thompson is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about economics, labor markets, and the entertainment business.

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