Infographic: How the Spider-Man Musical Spent Its First $50 Million

"Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," the most expensive musical in Broadway history, opened this month after burning through a record $75 million. Financial statements submitted in New York and snagged by the New York Times untangle the first $50 million in production costs, including $9 million in sets, costumes and shoes, $6 million in stagehands, and $1 million in lawyer fees.

To put the $50 million figure in perspective: That is nearly ten times more than the musical "Hair" cost and more than five times more than this year's Tony Award winner "The Book of Mormon." How does a musical spend $50 million? Here's how:




A short glossary of terms. Sets, props and instruments also includes hair, makeup, sound, projections, and the infamous harnesses that have, on occasion, not worked out so well. Pre-production/tech includes $6 million for local stagehands and $4 million for two years rent of the theater. Creative team includes items for directors, choreographers, lighting designers, aerial and set designers, and music producers. Production team includes casting directors, press agents, and lawyers.

And here's a granular breakdown of "sets, props and instruments," the green slice of the pie. All figures in MILLIONS:





Presented by

Derek Thompson is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about economics, labor markets, and the entertainment business.

What LBJ Really Said About Selma

"It's outrageous what's on TV. It looks like that man is in charge of the country."

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

What LBJ Really Said About Selma

"It's going to go from bad to worse."

Video

Does This Child Need Marijuana?

Inside a family's fight to use marijuana oils to treat epilepsy

Video

A Miniature 1950s Utopia

A reclusive artist built this idealized suburb to grapple with his painful childhood memories.

Video

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her school. Then the Internet heard her story.

More in Business

Just In