Blaming the White House for Gas Prices Is As Silly As ...

Say it with me now: The White House does not set gas prices. The White House does not set gas prices. The White House does not set gas prices.

Still, objective journalists write about the political impact of expensive gas as though it's perfectly reasonable to think otherwise [via AP]:

The president is among those who've said the surging price for crude is caused by worries about political upheaval in the Arab world and increasing demand from China and elsewhere.

Still, Americans have a tradition of holding the party in power responsible for rising gas costs.

See, the White House might not control international oil markets, but if enough people insist on blaming the president anyway, we should probably give both sides equal time! It made me wonder how this approach might address summer temperatures.

The president is among those who've said that surging temperatures across the country are caused by the summertime angle of the earth and longer exposure to sunlight.

Still, Americans have a tradition of holding the party in power responsible for higher mercury readings.

Or crying babies on airplanes.

The president is among those who've said that crying babies on airplanes are the result of emotionally fragile infants' being understandably nervous about sitting for three hours in a crowd of strangers within a strange metal tube flying through the air.

Still, Americans have a tradition of holding the party in power responsible for all inconveniences during travel.

Or the June 29 release of Transformers: Dark of the Moon.

The president is among those who've said the third and final film in the Transformers series is the result of the first two film's record-shattering opening weekends and Hollywood producers' dependence on explosive-heavy films for non-English speaking audiences.

Still, Americans have a tradition of holding the party in power responsible for Michael Bay's career.
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Derek Thompson is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about economics, labor markets, and the entertainment business.

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