U.S. Budget Deficit to Pass $1.5 Trillion This Year

More

"Grim" doesn't seem to be a terrifying enough word to describe the budget outlook that the CBO released Wednesday.  Oh, sure, we sort of knew this was coming--tax cuts are expensive if you don't find spending cuts to match.  And yet the numbers still hit one like a punch to the gut.  From a guy wearing brass knuckles.  Wrapped around a roll of  quarters.  Shiny new quarters that you can't really afford to use for punching people, because you've got a $1.5 trillion budget deficit this year.


What is there to say?  This has got to stop?  At this point, saying so feels sort of Job-like. Sepcifically, Job 14:  "Man born of woman is of few days, and full of trouble.  He cometh forth like a flower, and is cut down: he fleeth also as a shadow, and continueth not." It's absolutely true, of course, but it's kind of a downer.  And no matter how often you say it, you know you're still going to die.

It seems clearer and clearer that short of a near-death experience, no one is going to do anything about this problem. Our president spent over 5,000 words Tuesday kind of noting, offhand, that we might have a problem, and then studiously avoiding proposing any serious solutions to the problem.  Paul Ryan's response emphasized the problem, but not the ugly solutions: raise taxes, cut entitlements.  And Michelle Bachmann . . . well, what do you get when you cross a motivational speaker with an eighth grade social studies teacher?  I'll tell you what you don't get: any serious proposals to fix our budget woes.

The market is fully prepared to serve as judge, jury and executioner if we don't straighten up soon.  We don't have to fix the budget right now--but we do have to develop a credible plan that both sides can actually commit to.  Unfortunately, right now the only serious plan anyone seems to have is to put off making decisions, and hope that you'll be out of office when the day of judgment finally arrives.
Jump to comments
Presented by

Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Is Technology Making Us Better Storytellers?

How have stories changed in the age of social media? The minds behind House of Cards, This American Life, and The Moth discuss.


Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Is Technology Making Us Better Storytellers?

The minds behind House of Cards and The Moth weigh in.

Video

A Short Film That Skewers Hollywood

A studio executive concocts an animated blockbuster. Who cares about the story?

Video

In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

Video

What Is a Sandwich?

We're overthinking sandwiches, so you don't have to.

Video

Let's Talk About Not Smoking

Why does smoking maintain its allure? James Hamblin seeks the wisdom of a cool person.

Writers

Up
Down

More in Business

Just In