Goldman Hires Top Fed Derivatives Regulator to Navigate New Regulation

The revolving door connecting regulators and Wall Street certainly isn't slowing down. Earlier this month, we learned that former Office of Management and Budget chief Peter Orszag was going to Citigroup. Now, the New York Federal Reserve's derivatives reform head, Theo Lubke, is off to banking behemoth Goldman Sachs. Katya Wachtel from Business Insider explains:

Lubke was in charge of the New York Fed's effort to reform the private derivatives market and immediately succeeded Geithner when he decamped Washington.

Now the bank has hired him as their chief regulatory reform officer in the securities division to help navigate the impending overhaul of financial regulations in the derivatives market.

The role is brand new.

According to Wachtel, his Facebook profile says he likes "adventure sports paired with food and wine." Sounds like he'll be a perfect fit at Goldman.

Read the full story at Business Insider.

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Daniel Indiviglio was an associate editor at The Atlantic from 2009 through 2011. He is now the Washington, D.C.-based columnist for Reuters Breakingviews. He is also a 2011 Robert Novak Journalism Fellow through the Phillips Foundation. More

Indiviglio has also written for Forbes. Prior to becoming a journalist, he spent several years working as an investment banker and a consultant.

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