The 10 Biggest U.S. Cities That Risk Running Out of Water

Some of the nation's largest metropolitan areas are in danger of running out of water in the next decades, according to a survey of studies conducted by 24/7 Wall St.


(Story continues below)


We consulted a range of sources, including an October 2010 report on water risk by environmental research and sustainability group CERES, a July 2010 report from the National Resources Defense Council, and our own independent analysis of water supply and consumption in America's 30 largest cities. Using these sources, we created a ranking of cities likely to face severe water shortage in the near future. Above are the ten largest cities, by population, that have a significant chance of going dry in the decades to come.

Presented by

Douglas A. McIntyre and Michael B. Sauter are editors of 24/7 Wall St., a Delaware-based financial news and opinion operation that produces content for sites including MarketWatch, DailyFinance, Yahoo! Finance, and TheStreet.com.

Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

Video

The Health Benefits of Going Outside

People spend too much time indoors. One solution: ecotherapy.

Video

Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

Why did Green Bank, West Virginia, ban wireless signals? For science.

Video

Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

More in Business

Just In