An Electronic Snooper Is a Libertarian Who's Been Burgled

Or something like that.  Julian Sanchez, electronic surveillance watchdog, uses electronic surveillance to try to get his stuff back after a burglar breaks in.


Julian himself admits the irony, but really, this is a good thing.  If more people did what Julian is trying to, thefts of Playstations might become too risky to attempt.  Just a small percentage of cars with LoJack massively brings down the percentage of car thefts in the area, because if you jack 30 cars, you're virtually certain to get caught.  Similarly, more tracking of this kind might convince potential thieves of Playstations and like devices that crime really doesn't pay.
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Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

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