Parents Overwhelmingly Support Merit Pay for Teachers

From an economic standpoint, merit pay is generally regarded as a pretty effective tool to enhance worker performance. But it isn't easy to apply it in all settings. Case in point: education. Teachers' unions argue that basing pay on standardized testing will just cause teachers to gear lessons to the tests rather than aim for general knowledge and deeper learning. Yet, a new Gallup poll shows that parents overwhelming support merit pay for teachers. Here are the results:

teacher pay gallup 2010-08 - 4.jpg

It's pretty hard to get 70+% of Americans to agree about pretty much anything, so this is a rather staggering result. Of course, the powerful teachers unions won't likely be swayed. But if a better framework can be developed that doesn't rely on standardized tests, proponents of merit pay might be able to make more progress.

Read the full story at Gallup.

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Daniel Indiviglio was an associate editor at The Atlantic from 2009 through 2011. He is now the Washington, D.C.-based columnist for Reuters Breakingviews. He is also a 2011 Robert Novak Journalism Fellow through the Phillips Foundation. More

Indiviglio has also written for Forbes. Prior to becoming a journalist, he spent several years working as an investment banker and a consultant.

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