It's Not Easy Being Green: E-Readers Better Than Books for the Environment

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Or so says Slate.  I know a lot of people will crowd into the comments to sing the praises of old fashioned text, but I prefer both my Kindle and the Kindle reader on my iPad to reading hard copies.  And with the latest version of the Kindle now priced at less than $150, it's probably a savings for anyone who reads a lot of books--particularly public domain works.

Of course, I'm not much of a marginalia producer. And I have a well-documented love of gadgets.  But I still think that e-Readers are eventually going to supplant print.  There are just too many advantages, and unless you really love dusty pages, or are running a small personal lending library, the disadvantages are too small.

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Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

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