Having a Dog Around Makes You More Productive

Time for Congress to draw up a "cash for canines" stimulus:

New research shows that, in addition to being man's best friend, dogs improve productivity in the office.

Christopher Honts and coauthors gave 12 groups of four people a task to complete; some groups had a dog hanging around while they worked, while others didn't: "After the task, all the volunteers had to answer a questionnaire on how they felt about working with the other--human--members of the team. Mr. Honts found that those who had had a dog to slobber and pounce on them ranked their team-mates more highly on measures of trust, team cohesion and intimacy than those who had not."

Read the full story at Freakonomics.

Presented by

Derek Thompson is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about economics, labor markets, and the entertainment business.

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