iPhone Users Like Upgrades More Than They Hate AT&T

On Thursday, an impressive 1.5 million people purchased an iPhone 4. Yet, the vast majority of these individuals already owned a previous version of the iPhone. Presumably, they didn't think it was worth waiting several months to see if Apple would open the device up to other carriers. Instead, they will stick with AT&T for at least two more years. Their desire to have the latest Apple toy must overshadow any annoyance they feel towards AT&T's network. PCWorld provides the stats:

Piper Jaffray researchers report that 77 percent of the iPhone 4 sales yesterday were to existing iPhone users upgrading from a previous model. Combining that with the estimated 1.5 million iPhone 4s sold, it would seem that more than 1.1 million iPhone users jumped at the chance to switch to the redesigned iPhone 4.

Read the full story at PCWorld.

Presented by

Daniel Indiviglio was an associate editor at The Atlantic from 2009 through 2011. He is now the Washington, D.C.-based columnist for Reuters Breakingviews. He is also a 2011 Robert Novak Journalism Fellow through the Phillips Foundation. More

Indiviglio has also written for Forbes. Prior to becoming a journalist, he spent several years working as an investment banker and a consultant.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A Stop-Motion Tour of New York City

A filmmaker animated hundreds of still photographs to create this Big Apple flip book

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open for 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

Video

What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

Science cannot fully explain near-death experiences.

More in Business

Just In