Facebook Suffers Yet Another Privacy Glitch

Another day, another Facebook privacy snafu.

You know, the company's new plan for storing and sharing consumer data collected via plug-ins around the Internet should be much more exciting for users if it didn't suffer a privacy setback every few months.

Unfortunately that's the world we live in:

Facebook chat is suspiciously disabled this morning after reports that a glitch allowed users to view their friends' conversations. In March, we were wondering:  Just how many more privacy glitches can Facebook get away with? That time, Facebook had inadvertently revealed user e-mail addresses to the public. A month before, Facebook accidentally sent a bunch of private messages to unintended recipients, including an editor at the Wall Street Journal who publicized the incident...

How did it happen in the first place?

It seems that a feature meant to enhance user privacy actually ended up exposing private conversations ... In "preview" mode, you can see what your profile looks like when your best friend, your mom or an employer views it. Because of a glitch, however, it sounds like you could also see some activity from that person's Facebook account--including private chats.


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Derek Thompson is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about economics, labor markets, and the entertainment business.

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